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Get the lead out

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  • Get the lead out

    I noted that a number of teams are using lead weights to add weight to their robots. With all the increased concern for safety this seems like a clear problem. Kids handling lead in the morning then eating lunch. This seems like a clear ingestion hazard exists. I found one group that wanted to fine tune their lead weights by drilling holes into them. One has to wonder where the lead shavings are going once they have been removed from the weight. It is not legal in this state to throw hazardous waste in the trash. There are clearly safer ways to add weight to a robot.

  • #2
    Re: Get the lead out

    i agree, that is surely dangerous and there must be a safer way, like using fishing weights or something like that.

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    • #3
      Re: Get the lead out

      Tarek,

      Using lead is a clear violation of <R42>. If you had brought this to the attention of the Lead Robot Inspector at your event, he (or she) would have stopped this robot from competing until the hazardous material was removed.

      Moreover, most inspectors would force the team to remove the material from the event facility.

      Please email me at [email protected] with the specifics and I will follow this up.

      Thank you.

      Mike

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      • #4
        Re: Get the lead out

        The rule says to disallow anything hazardous on its MSDS. Most robots have materials added that would be considered hazardous on their MSDS. Most steel alloys are hazardous (chromium), so most steel shavings are hazardous by FIRST's standards just like lead. Most solders are hazardous (lead or antimony). Electronic components contain a wide variety of heavy metals. Most lubricants are hazardous on their MSDS. Generallly the key to safety in handling these materials is good hygiene and common sense (e.g. wash your hands before lunch, collect the shavings/spills) when in doubt consult the MSDS. Lead shavings represent a low acute risk which probably should be the main FIRST safety concern. I would be more concerned about caustics, flammables and compressed gases. FIRST could probably provide clearer guidance in this matter.

        I don't know the Haz Waste disposal regs in your jurisdiction, but for most materials in most jurisdictions there is a threshhold quantity below which the regs are inapplicable.

        Richard Vogel
        OSHA Certified Hazardous Waste Operator

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        • #5
          Re: Get the lead out

          Originally posted by Michael Betts
          Tarek,

          Using lead is a clear violation of <R42>. If you had brought this to the attention of the Lead Robot Inspector at your event, he (or she) would have stopped this robot from competing until the hazardous material was removed.

          Moreover, most inspectors would force the team to remove the material from the event facility.

          Please email me at [email protected] with the specifics and I will follow this up.

          Thank you.

          Mike
          That is incorrect. Bill Miller has clearly stated that the use of lead on the robot is permitted (in fact, for any item that has been soldered, it is unavoidable). Machining of the material is not permitted in the pits (e.g. drilling, filing, sawing, or anything else that might create shavings, particles or vapor). But the use of pre-formed or pre-machined lead for use as weights, ballast, shims, etc. is OK.


          .

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