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Use of jig that extends out of the launch area

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  • #16
    Originally posted by WilliamFrantz View Post

    Right, so as I said, you could position the robot using an oversized jig, then remove the jig before launch such that only the robot is in LA when the robot is launched. That's Rule 21.
    Yes, that's likely OK.
    FIRST LEGO League Mentor and Referee/Head Referee since 2011.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by OllyLi View Post
      But anyway, using jigs to pre-align robot is never the best idea.
      I would agree to that, but squaring on the west wall was very helpful in years past. Looking back, we started on the west wall 75% of the time. Looking at
      ​what the kids have planned for this year, I'm guessing they would have at least one run starting east.
      ​​​​

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      • #18
        Originally posted by korey99 View Post

        I would agree to that, but squaring on the west wall was very helpful in years past. Looking back, we started on the west wall 75% of the time. Looking at
        ​what the kids have planned for this year, I'm guessing they would have at least one run starting east.
        ​​​​
        If your robot has a flat side or other "wall-follower" friendly construction, starting facing east with one side along the south wall is a reasonable option.

        Mastering a quick 90 degree pivot turn also works for some scenarios.

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        • #19
          I've found the lack of a West wall problematic this year. It takes a bit longer and a bit more skill to line something up visually rather than just pushing the robot up against a wall. This year, if you want the robot to head East, you have to visually align it both north-to-south and east-to-west. There are more degrees of freedom. In past years, we tried to rely on a wall to eliminate at least one of those.

          What we've been doing instead is to always start with the back against the South wall. The first move is to pull away from the wall a few inches, measure the rotation using the gyro (it's rarely zero), then make the first turn while correcting for any initial skew. It seems to be working fairly well.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by WilliamFrantz View Post
            I've found the lack of a West wall problematic this year. It takes a bit longer and a bit more skill to line something up visually rather than just pushing the robot up against a wall. This year, if you want the robot to head East, you have to visually align it both north-to-south and east-to-west. There are more degrees of freedom. In past years, we tried to rely on a wall to eliminate at least one of those.

            What we've been doing instead is to always start with the back against the South wall. The first move is to pull away from the wall a few inches, measure the rotation using the gyro (it's rarely zero), then make the first turn while correcting for any initial skew. It seems to be working fairly well.
            I have two groups of students doing it the same way. They launch the same way for every mission.

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            • #21
              I have a team using the "oversized jig method". The jig goes from the west wall into the LA. The kids square up the bot then remove the jig and set it in home, then launch. The problem is, sometimes they forget to remove the jig before launching. What should Referees do when this happens? No score? Take a token? Just a warning? Other?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by rising eagle View Post
                I have a team using the "oversized jig method". The jig goes from the west wall into the LA. The kids square up the bot then remove the jig and set it in home, then launch. The problem is, sometimes they forget to remove the jig before launching. What should Referees do when this happens? No score? Take a token? Just a warning? Other?
                My personal preferences (as a head referee):
                • If the referees are on their game, they will stop the team from launching the robot until the jig is in a legal position.
                • Or, (less desirable) they could make the team re-launch the robot again. Since the launch wasn't legal, it never happened, and there probably won't be an Interruption penalty or Token lost.
                • Or, (even less desirable) they could let the launch proceed, but not allow scoring for any missions accomplished on that launch.
                Referees should not take a Token for any reason other than the one given in the rules - an Interruption that isn't completely-in Home. But, they can take whatever actions are necessary to prevent the team from scoring missions in an illegal manner.
                FIRST LEGO League Mentor and Referee/Head Referee since 2011.

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